Category Archives: How To

How to Interpret a Marriage Record?

Standard Entry in a Marriage Record 

 

Latin Terms Appearing in the Form

Numerus Serialis or Nr. posit. (Serial Number or Position Number)
Dies et Mensis Natus et Baptisatus  (Day and Month of Birth and Baptism) Numerus Domus (House Number)
Sponsus (groom)
Sponsa (bride)
Nomen (Name)
Religio (Religion)
Coelebes/Viduus or Vidua/Aetas (Unmarried/Widower or Widow/Age)
filius (son of…) Continue reading

How to Interpret a Death Record?

Standard Entry in a Death Record 

Latin Terms Appearing in the Form

Numerus Serialis or Nr. posit. (Serial Number or Position Number)
Dies et Mensis Natus et Baptisatus  (Day and Month of Birth and Baptism) Numerus Domus (House Number)
Nomen (Name)
Religio (Religion)
Coelebes/Viduus or Vidua/Aetas (Unmarried/Widower or Widow/Age)
filius (son of…) filia (daughter of…)        sometimes abbreviated for both (fil.)         filius leg. (legitimate son)
filia leg. (legitimate daughter)
fil. leg. (abbreviation for both)
de (of)
de domo (of the house of)
ex (from)
nata (born – with the maiden name)
habit. (in + place name residing in…)
de (+ place name from…)
nat. in (+ place name born in…)
p.d. (post delicta)
deceasedReligio (Religion) Continue reading

How to Interpret a Birth Record?

Standard Entry in a Birth Record

Latin Terms Appearing in the Form

Pag. (page number)              Liber natorum(Book of births)

1906 (the year 1906)

Dies et Mensis (Day and Month)

Natus (Birth) Baptisatus (Baptism)

Numerus Domus (House Number) Continue reading

Citizenship and Naturalization Records

From 1763 until the Canadian Citizenship Act came into force on January 1, 1947, people born in Canada were all British subjects. Since immigrants born in Great Britain and the Commonwealth were already British subjects, they had no need to become naturalized or to obtain British citizenship in Canada.

A number of earlier laws governed naturalization before 1947. Under these acts, aliens could petition for naturalization. If successful, they would swear allegiance to the British sovereign and would be granted the rights of someone born within the British Empire. These acts include:

  • The Local Act also known as Law of Naturalization and Allegiance implemented on May 22, 1868.
  • The Naturalization and Aliens Act of 1881 by which the Secretary of State was empowered to issue naturalization certificates to government employees. All other requests for naturalization were handled by provincial courts.
  • The Naturalization Act of 1914 which gave full responsibility for the issuance of naturalization certificates to the federal Department of Citizenship and Immigration, implemented in 1916.

Continue reading

SIX STEPS TO FINDING AN ANCESTOR


Step One: Locate their birthplace.—What if your ancestors came from a small town or village and you don’t know the exact name of that town? This information is vital to your research. You can’t write to Ukraine for civil or church records unless you know exactly where your ancestor(s) lived. If you don’t have a relative who can direct you but your ancestor died in Canada, then they would have left a “paper trail.” This you can search for their town of origin. There are a number of documents, which may reveal the name of the village/town, such as their: Naturalization papers,  Marriage Records, Death Records,  Church Records, Cemetery Records and Funeral Home Records

Step Two: Locate the village/Town in a Gazetteer—Once you know the exact name of their town, then you can consult a Gazetteer. This will tell the Continue reading